Why I’m Embracing My Love of Self-Help Books + My Recommendations

Hello bookish friends! Welcome back to Lady Gets Lit!

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Today I’m bringing you another bookish discussion! One of my goals this year is to write more discussion posts, whether it’s about books, writing, or mental health.

I have a confession to make: I’m addicted to Self-Help books.

When I was about ten years old, I went through this phase where I was obsessed with Chicken Soup for the Soul. I read the one for kids, then I read the one for pet owners, then I read the one for pre-teens, then I read the one for teens (which definitely scarred me a little bit). Why did I love these books so much? Because as cliched as the feelings were, they rang true to some extent. Reading them was cathartic in a way I didn’t know how to articulate.

I’ve been in the closet about my love of Self-Help (or, as we call it at work now, Personal Growth) books for a long time.

As I got older, I started to realize how these types of books essentially say the same thing in a variety of ways. In some ways, Self-Help capitalizes on human emotions and struggles. These authors claim to have all the answers to the problems of being human, yet most of their advice boils down to things we could figure out on our own.

More than that, Self-Help gets a bad rap as being pretty hokey, encouraging you to live like you’re already rich, manifest your own destiny, and other (potentially harmful) ideas. As someone who grew up Christian, these ideas sound a lot like the oft-touted “pray about it!” that appears in religious circles. Some of these solutions aren’t necessarily practical for most people.

For a long time, I resisted the pull of Self-Help. Instead, I went to therapy, I made compulsive to-do lists, and I asked a lot from myself. And then, on a whim—and because I could read it for free—I picked up You Are A Badass.

Jen Sincero’s book didn’t change my life. I read through it pretty quickly, and while I found myself nodding along at certain points, I didn’t necessarily buy into all of what she says. Most of the advice is recycled and reformatted from what other writers have said time and time again. Additionally, much of her advice erases the experiences of people dealing with mental health issues; for instance, she insists on having a positive attitude, which is nearly impossible for me when I’m in the midst of a depressive episode.

I didn’t love You Are A Badass, but it did spur me on to read more.

Here’s the thing: there’s a reason Personal Growth books are so popular—because many people are always looking for ways to become better than they are currently.

There’s a lot of unhelpful, cheap trash in the Self-Help genre. It’s not always possible to quit that job you hate, to treat yourself like you’re already as wealthy as you hope to be. Not everyone can (or should) manifest their own destiny.

And yet, there’s a lot of hope in these books. There’s a lot of wise advice that is only repetitive because, for many of us, it takes repeating for it to really sink in.

So I thought I’d share some of what I’ve learned along the way—even if it’s cheesy and repetitive. Because I’m done living in the closet with my love of Self-Help / Personal Growth.

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things I’ve learned from self-help books

M. Scott Peck, The Road Less Traveled – Life sucks, but once we accept that life is hard, it ceases to be hard.

Anne Lamott, Bird By Bird – You will never achieve success or happiness as a writer if you only write out of the hope of becoming published. You have to love writing, otherwise it’s not worth it.

Thich Nhat Hanh, The Miracle of Mindfulness – The key to mindfulness is to try and be fully present with whatever it is that you’re doing—even if it’s washing the dishes.

Jen Sincero, You Are A Badass – Don’t let anyone else define your self-worth, and don’t waste your time chasing external validation.

Julia Cameron, The Artist’s Way – I am allowed to nurture myself.

Mark Manson, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck – You can’t possible care about everything, so choose your values wisely and don’t waste your time on what’s not valuable to you.

Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky, Make Time – There’s power in choosing one thing each day that you’re going to focus on and then setting aside time specifically to do that. Also, delete all the distracting crap off your phone.

Erin Falconer, How to Get Sh*t Done – Beyond just getting clear about what you want (not what other people want), narrow your goals to three big things. You can’t possibly do more than that, but if you’re specific about your Big Three, you can focus your energy on accomplishing them.

Rachel Hollis, Girl, Wash Your Face – When you make promises to yourself that you can’t keep, you’re training yourself that your words don’t matter, and that you don’t matter. Stop lying to yourself.

bonus: self-help books on my TBR

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Do you read Self-Help books? Who are your go-to authors for inspiration? Are you a closet fan of a category of books? I’d love to hear from you!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Standalone Books That Deserve a Sequel

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. Each week, bloggers come together to build a list on pre-selected topics. If you’d like to join in, check out That Artsy Reader Girl’s post for more info!

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I love a good standalone book.

To be quite honest, long book series are really intimidating to me. I’m bad at getting invested in a series because I don’t enjoy being sucked into one world for too long. On the flip side, standalones* leave a lot to the imagination. As I was compiling this list, I realized that mainly what I want is more of my favorite characters, in all their flaws and especially their triumphs.

*does anyone else feel like standalone and sequel are just really weird words? No? It’s just me? …

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Top 10 Standalone Books That Need a Sequel

The Book: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth
Why I want a sequel: I loved getting to know Cam so much that I miss her, still.

The Book: What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera
Why I want a sequel: I still want to see what happens with Arthur and Ben grow up and go off on their own in the world.

The Book: Home and Away by Candice Montgomery
Why I want a sequel: further development of Tasia’s relationship with her birth father + more steamy romance.

The Book: On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
Why I want a sequel: the vagueness of the ending made me desperate to see what happens next for Bri.

The Book: Noteworthy by Riley Redgate
Why I want a sequel: I’m in love with boarding school settings.

The Book: Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee
Why I want a sequel: mostly I just want to see more out ace characters, period.

The Book: Not Otherwise Specified by Hannah Moskowitz
Why I want a sequel: This book has one of my favorite recovery narratives of all time – because it’s messy, and incomplete, and a constant thing in Ella’s life.

The Book: Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert
Why I want a sequel: I want to see more of Suzette’s bisexuality (because I love bi rep and I’m selfish)

The Book: Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall
Why I want a sequel: the book shows Nora really struggling with her mental health, so I’d like a glimpse of her on the flip side of things—and maybe even dealing with a relapse while she’s in a new relationship.

The Book: Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera
Why I want a sequel: Juliet makes such a powerful character and I’d love to see more of her personal growth into her twenties.

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Do you prefer standalone or series books? What is your favorite standalone book that you wish had a sequel? Do you participate in Top 10 Tuesday? Let me know in the comments!